Hansel and Gretel

Hansel & Gretel are in the depths of magical woodland but desperate to find their way home. From stones to crumbs, can they follow their trail or will they be side-tracked by the allure of that sticky, sweet home in the woods? And what about the little old lady within? She seems positively lovely…
Photo:Dragos Robatzchi

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Eden Project

The Eden Project (Cornish: Edenva) is a popular visitor attraction in Cornwall, England. Inside the two biomes are plants that are collected from many diverse climates and environments. The project is located in a reclaimed Kaolinite pit, located 2 km (1.2 mi) from the town of St Blazey and 5 km (3 mi) from the larger town of St Austell, Cornwall.[2]

The complex is dominated by two huge enclosures consisting of adjoining domes that house thousands of plant species,[3] and each enclosure emulates a natural biome. The biomes consist of hundreds of hexagonal and pentagonal, inflated, plastic cells supported by steel frames. The largest of the two biomes simulates a Rainforest environment and the second, a Mediterranean environment. The attraction also has an outside botanical garden which is home to many plants and wildlife native to Cornwall and the UK in general; it also has many plants that provide an important and interesting backstory, for example, those with a prehistoric heritage.

At the bottom of the pit are two covered biomes:

The Tropical Biome, covers 1.56 ha (3.9 acres) and measures 55 m (180 ft) high, 100 m (328 ft) wide, and 200 m (656 ft) long. It is used for tropical plants, such as fruiting banana plants, coffee, rubber and giant bamboo, and is kept at a tropical temperature and moisture level.

The Tropical Biome

The Mediterranean Biome covers 0.654 ha (1.6 acres) and measures 35 m (115 ft) high, 65 m (213 ft) wide, and 135 m (443 ft) long. It houses familiar warm temperate and arid plants such as olives and grape vines and various sculptures.

The Outdoor Gardens represent the temperate regions of the world with plants such as tea, lavender, hops, hemp and sunflowers, as well as local plant species.

The covered biomes are constructed from a tubular steel (hex-tri-hex) with mostly hexagonal external cladding panels made from the thermoplastic ETFE. Glass was avoided due to its weight and potential dangers. The cladding panels themselves are created from several layers of thin UV-transparent ETFE film, which are sealed around their perimeter and inflated to create a large cushion. The resulting cushion acts as a thermal blanket to the structure. The ETFE material is resistant to most stains, which simply wash off in the rain. If required, cleaning can be performed by abseilers. Although the ETFE is susceptible to punctures, these can be easily fixed with ETFE tape. The structure is completely self-supporting, with no internal supports, and takes the form of a geodesic structure. The panels vary in size up to 9 m (29.5 ft) across, with the largest at the top of the structure.

The ETFE technology was supplied and installed by the firm Vector Foiltec, which is also responsible for ongoing maintenance of the cladding. The steel spaceframe and cladding package (with Vector Foiltec as ETFE subcontractor) was designed, supplied and installed by MERO (UK) PLC, who also jointly developed the overall scheme geometry with the architect, Nicholas Grimshaw & Partners.

The entire build project was managed by McAlpine Joint Venture.

The clay pit in which the project is sited was in use for over 160 years.[8] In 1981, the pit was used by the BBC as the planet surface of Magrathea in the 1981 TV series of the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.[9] By the mid-1990s the pit was all but exhausted.[10]

The initial idea for the project dates back to 1996, with construction beginning in 1998. The work was hampered by torrential rain in the first few months of the project, and parts of the pit flooded as it sits 15 m (49 ft) below the water table.[10]

The first part of the Eden Project, the visitor centre, opened to the public in May 2000. The first plants began arriving in September of that year,[10] and the full site opened on 17 March 2001.

The Eden Project was used as a filming location for the 2002 James Bond film, Die Another Day (starring Pierce Brosnan). On 2 July 2005 The Eden Project hosted the „Africa Calling” concert of the Live 8 concert series. It has also provided some plants for the British Museum‘s Africa garden.

In 2005, the Project launched „A Time of Gifts” for the winter months, November to February. This features an ice rink covering the lake, with a small café/bar attached, as well as a Christmas market. Cornish choirs regularly perform in the biomes.

On 6 December 2007, the Eden Project invited people all over Cornwall to try to break the world record for the biggest ever pub quiz as part of its campaign to bring £50 million of lottery funds to Cornwall.[11]

In December 2007, the project failed in its bid for £50 million of funding, after the Big Lottery Fund popular vote,[12] when it received just 12.07% of the votes, the lowest for the four projects being considered.[13] Eden wanted the money for Edge, a proposed desert biome that was going to look at people and plants living on the edge today and the solutions that they have come up with to the challenge of living within limits.[14]

In December 2009, much of the project, including both greenhouses, became available to navigate through Google Street View.

The Eden Trust revealed a trading loss of £1.3 million for 2012-13,on a turnover of £25.4 million. The Eden Project had posted a surplus of £136,000 for the previous year. In 2014 Eden accounts showed a surplus of £2 million.[15]

The World Pasty Championships have been held at the Eden Project since 2012, an international competition to find the best Cornish pasties and other pasty-type savoury snacks.[16][17] The Eden Project is said to have contributed over £1 billion to the Cornish economy.[18]

Eden Sessions

Since 2002, the Project has hosted a series of musical performances, called the Eden Sessions. Artists have included Amy Winehouse, James Morrison, Muse, Lily Allen, Snow Patrol, Pulp, Brian Wilson and The Magic Numbers. 2008’s summer headliners were: The Verve, Kaiser Chiefs, and KT Tunstall. Oasis were also set to play in the summer of 2008, but the concert was postponed because Noel Gallagher was unable to perform after breaking three ribs in a stage invasion incident several weeks before. The concert was instead played in the summer of 2009.[19] 2010 saw performances from artists including Mika, Jack Johnson, Mojave 3, Doves, Paolo Nutini, Mumford & Sons, and Martha Wainwright.

The 2011 sessions were headlined by The Flaming Lips, Primal Scream, Pendulum, Fleet Foxes and Brandon Flowers with support from The Horrors, The Go! Team, OK Go, Villagers, and The Bees.[20]

The 2012 Eden sessions were headlined by: Tim Minchin, Example, Frank Turner, Chase & Status, Plan B, Blink-182, Noah and the Whale, and The Vaccines.[20]

The 2013 Eden Sessions were headlined by: Kaiser Chiefs, Jessie J, Eddie Izzard, Sigur Rós, and The xx.[20]

The 2014 Eden Sessions were headlined by: Dizzee Rascal, Skrillex, Pixar in Concert, Ellie Goulding and Elbow.[20]

The 2015 Eden Sessions were headlined by: Paolo Nutini, Elton John, Paloma Faith, Motörhead, The Stranglers, Spandau Ballet and Ben Howard.[20]

The 2016 Eden Sessions were headlined by: Lionel Richie, Tom Jones, PJ Harvey, Manic Street Preachers and Jess Glynne.[20]

Text:Wikipedia

 

The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Heligan, seat of the Tremayne family for more than 400 years, is one of the most mysterious and romantic estates in England. A genuine secret garden, it was lost for decades; its history consigned to overgrowth. At the end of the nineteenth century Heligan’s thousand acres were at their zenith, but only a few years later bramble and ivy were already drawing a green veil over this “Sleeping Beauty”. The outbreak of WW1 was the start of the estate’s demise as its workforce went off to fight in the trenches; many sadly never to return. This was a story played out in many of the large estates throughout Britain’s war period.

Unlike many other estates, however, the gardens and land at Heligan were never sold or developed. In fact, it wasn’t until the 1970s that Heligan House itself was eventually sold and split into private apartments.

After decades of neglect, the devastating hurricane of 1990 should have consigned the now lost gardens to a footnote in history.

Instead, events conspired to bring us here and the romance of their decay took a hold on our imaginations. Our discovery of a tiny room, buried under fallen masonry in the corner of one of the walled gardens, was to unlock the secret of their demise. A motto etched into the limestone walls in barely legible pencil still reads “Don’t come here to sleep or slumber”, with the names of those who worked there signed under the date – August 1914. We were fired by a magnificent obsession to bring these once glorious gardens back to life in every sense and to tell, for the first time, not tales of lords and ladies but of those “ordinary” people who had made these gardens great, before departing for the Great War.

In 2013, the Imperial War Museum recognised Heligan’s Thunderbox Room as a ‘Living Memorial’ to ‘The Gardeners of Heligan’. A plaque, a Cornish shovel and a WW1 helmet now mark the spot and details can be found on www.iwm.org.uk under entry 63622.

We have now established a large working team with its own vision for our third decade. The award-winning garden restoration is already internationally acclaimed; but our lease now extends into well over 200 acres, leaving the project far from complete. We intend Heligan to remain a living and working example of the best of past practice, offering public access into the heart of what we do.

Our contemporary focus is to work with nature, accepting and respecting it and protecting and enhancing the variety of habitats with which our project is endowed.

Text: Heligan.com